T. Balasaraswati – 1918-1984

In the Kandappa – Bala technique, all the technical sections from the basic steps to the items of repertoire were always taught by my revered dance-master K. Ganesan, the only son of the illustrious Kandappa, teacher of Bala. Bala was present most of the time during rigorous sessions of Nritta and kept a watchful eye on the student. Once the student has perfect Nritta co-ordination, mastering all the technical repertoire,Bala would first begin with Sabdam, and proceed in a leisurely manner to the other items – the lyrical part of the Varnam, the Padams & Javali. The tempo of the…

Dr. V. Raghavan’s Contribution to Dance

Dr.V.Raghavan’s reach and research on the varied dance forms and traditions which got enlarged over decades of his brilliant academic contributions, were driven by two major influences: the first being the great aesthetic appeal of grand performances of the dance par-excellence of South India-Bhartanatyam as seen by him right from his young age both in his native village and around but also those at prominent cultural venues of the then Madras Presidency; the second being his close association with renowned practitioners, scholars, and other cultural personalities in the fields of Music and Dance. These influences accelerated his deep interest to…

About The Samskrita Ranga

The Samskrita Ranga, Madras, is an organization founded for the promotion of Sanskrit dramatic activities. Its activities include the production of Sanskrit plays on the stage, as well as on the radio, research and publication in the field of Sanskrit Drama, and lectures and expositions relating to Sanskrit and allied theatre forms in India and SouthEast Asia. Although the Ranga as such was founded on 16th November, 1958 on the occasion of the First All India Kālidāsa Festival at Ujjain, it is really a continuation of the work that had been already going on in Madras in the presentation of…

Samskrita Ranga – The Torch Bearer Of Sanskrit Drama

Every Indian classical art form flourishing today derives its theory and practice from the rich source material available in the medium of Sanskrit language. More so for the evolution and development of fine arts and its varied branches in India, this glorious language and its literature have provided the solid base. Modern Indian Drama was for many decades merely a pale copy of Western theatre; but beginning with the establishment of the National School of Drama in 1959 there has been a renaissance of traditional dramatic forms. Especially notable is the revival of Sanskrit Drama and its well-conceived presentation of…

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